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Download instructions

To download the QWET installation package, or the source codes of QWET and WET, you must first register a free Gitlab account. When signing into the WET Gitlab page, you will get access to the software, an "Issues" board (effectively a discussion and user support forum) and wikis.

Why do you need to register to access QWET or WET?

QWET and WET are free, open source, software packages. However, in order for the developer team at Aarhus University to have internal support for offering ongoing maintenance and future improvements to QWET and WET, we need to demonstrate the strength and impact of the software tools through the collection of some basic information on how many is using the software.

We have prepared a short instructional video on how to register a Gitlab account, and then downloading and installing WET. 

Prerequisites

Before installing QWET, please make sure you have already installed QGIS3. We recommend using QGIS3 64 bit version (available here: www.qgis.org).

Preparing user-defined input files for QWET (optional)

On this page, you can learn how to prepare and use user-defined input files for meteorological data, water and nutrient loads. In addition to these model input files, users can also prepare and load observation files (e.g., temperature, nutrient and oxygen profiles, etc.).

To read in user defined inputs, the following procedure must be followed:

  1. Prepare user input files in correct format
  2. Create QWET project
  3. Place user input files in specific subdirectory of your QWET project
  4. Select “User-defined” input in QWET
    - this can currently be done in step 4.1 (weather forcing) and step 4.4 (water and nutrient load)

To be able to read user defined data from external input files, four individual file types may currently be prepared for QWET:

  1. meteo_file.dat (meteorological data)
  2. inflow.dat (inflow of water)
  3. inflow_chem.dat (nutrient concentrations in the inflowing water)
  4. *.obs (files with observation data)

Once the files have been created, you should create a new WET project in QGIS. This will generate a QWET working directory with ..\CLIMATE\ and ..\INFLOWS_OUTFLOWS\ subdirectories. Once the QWET project has been created, and you receive the message “The model directory was successfully created”, you should navigate to these subdirectories and place the custom user files here before continuing the model setup in QWET.

Placing meteo_file.dat in correct folder:

Your meteo_file.dat should be saved to a “User_xxxxx” folder, which you should create within the “CLIMATE” subdirectory of your QWET projects’ working directory, where xxxxx may be any text string (without spaces). For example: \QWET_projects\lake_ravn\CLIMATE\User_ravn\meteo_file.dat

Placing inflow.dat and inflow_chem.dat in correct folder:

Your inflow.dat and inflow_chem.dat files should be saved to a “User_xxxxx” folder, which you should create within the “INFLOWS_OUTFLOWS” subdirectory of your QWET projects’ working directory, where xxxxx may be any text string (without spaces). For example: \QWET_projects\lake_ravn\INFLOWS_OUTFLOWS\User_ravn\inflow.dat
\QWET_projects\lake_ravn\INFLOWS_OUTFLOWS\User_ravn\inflow_chem.dat

Placing *.obs files in correct folder:

Your observation files (*.obs) should be saved to the “observations” folder, which you will find within the “LAKEMODEL\Default” subdirectory of your QWET projects’ working directory. For example: \QWET_projects\lake_ravn\LAKEMODEL\Default\observations\*.obs

1. Preparing meteo_file.dat

The meteorological data file comprises eight columns (and rows at preferably subdaily temporal resolution), including (in this order):

1.  Date [yyyy-mm-dd]
2.  Time [hh:mm:ss]
3.  Eastward component (U10) of wind at 10m height [m/s]
4.  Northward component (V10) of wind at 10m height [m/s]

Note: if only the wind speed is known, and not direction and thereby the wind components, then set the U10 column to the recorded wind speed and the V10 column to 0. If you have data on wind speed and direction, you can derive U10 and V10 (see info here and here for conversion).

5.  Air pressure (atmospheric pressure at surface) [hPa]
6.  Air temperature [°C]
7.  Dew-point temperature [°C]

Note: by default in QWET, dew-point temperature is used, as “hum_method” (under the “Parameters” menu in QWET).
Alternative 1: relative humidity (%) may be used instead (ranging 0-100), whereby the user must change “hum_method” to 1 (accessed under the “Parameters” menu in QWET).
Alternative 2: wet bulp temperature (°C) may be used instead, whereby the user must change “hum_method” to 2 (accessed under the “Parameters” menu in QWET).

8.  Cloud cover fraction (ranging 0-1) [-]

The file must be saved in tab or space delimited ascii (text) format and have the filename and extension “meteo_file.dat”. Note the fixed format of the date (yyyy-mm-dd) and time (hh:mm:ss), which must be followed. If a file is prepared in MS Excel, note that MS Excel may change the date and time formats (each single time the file is opened in excel), and users may therefore need to change the date and time formats in excel just before saving file in a tab or space delimited text file. 

An example of a meteo_file.dat file of correct format can be found here.

2. Preparing inflow.dat

In QWET, the inflow data file currently represents the aggregated inflow for the entire system. Hence, if data from multiple inflows exist, these should be aggregated into a total inflow value. Note that the model will automatically interpolate (by linear interpolation) between inflow values listed in the file. This means that data in the inflow file do not need to be equidistant (i.e. the time step may vary in the inflow file, for example reflecting actual gauging dates).

The inflow data file comprises three columns including (in this order):

  1. Date [yyyy-mm-dd]
  2. Time [hh:mm:ss]
  3. Discharge [m3/s]

An example of an inflow.dat file of correct format can be found here.

3. Preparing inflow_chem.dat

In WET, the inflow chemistry data file currently represents the aggregated inflow for the entire system. Hence, if nutrient data from multiple inflows exist, these should be aggregated into a total inflow value (i.e. flow-weighted inflow concentrations). Note that the model will automatically interpolate (by linear interpolation) between concentration values listed in the file. This means that data in the inflow chemistry file do not need to be equidistant (i.e. the time step may vary in the inflow file, for example reflecting data and dates of actual sampling dates).

The inflow chemistry data file comprises nine columns including (in this order):

  1. Date [yyyy-mm-dd]
  2. Time [hh:mm:ss]
  3. Particulate organic phosphorus concentration (PPOM) [mg P/L]
  4. Dissolved organic phosphorus concentration (PDOM) [mg P/L]
  5. Phosphate concentration [mg P/L]
  6. Particulate organic nitrogen concentration (NPOM) [mg N/L]
  7. Dissolved organic nitrogen concentration (NDOM) [mg N/L]
  8. Nitrate concentration [mg N/L]
  9. Ammonium concentration [mg N/L]

An example of an inflow_chem.dat file of correct format can be found here.

4. Preparing *.obs files

In WET, you can compare model output with time series observations for a range of different state variables. You may prepare one file for each state variable that you have observations for.

The observation files must comprise four columns including (in this order):

  1. Date [yyyy-mm-dd]
  2. Time [hh:mm:ss]
  3. Depth from surface [m] (Negative values. For example, -1 represents 1 meters depth below surface)
  4. Value of state variable concentration (in units corresponding to model output units, e.g. Celcius for temperature, mg/L for nutrients and oxygen, and μg/L for chlorophyll a)

An example of an *.obs file of correct format can be found here. The names of the individual observations files must match that defined in the wet_obs.xml file that is also located in the "observations" folder. For further details, please watch this tutorial video on how to format and work with observations in WET.

Test case Lake Ravn

From the following link you can download data and files for a QWET test case. The test case is based on the Danish Lake Ravn situated in the central part of Jylland. The lake is approx. 32 meters deep with a surface area of 1.8 square kilometers.

The test case should be downloaded to follow the tutorial video "from scratch to simulation", which takes you from scratch to simulation in QWET.

Papers

QWET (formerly known as WET) was originally developed by: Nielsen, A., Bolding, K., Hu, F. and Trolle, D. 2017. The original publication on the concept of WET was published in Environmental Modelling and Software. Please cite this publication when using WET:

Nielsen, A., Bolding, K., Hu, F. and Trolle, D. 2017. An open source QGIS-based workflow for model application and experimentation with aquatic ecosystems. Environmental Modelling and Software 95: 358-364.

The aquatic ecosystem core of QWET is the WET model. The WET is based on FABM-PCLake, which was developed by Hu et al. 2016, and can be cited as:

Hu, F., Bolding, K., Bruggeman, J., Jeppesen, E., Flindt, M. R., van Gerven, L., Janse, J. H., Janssen, A. B. G., Kuiper, J. J., Mooij, W. M., and Trolle, D. 2016. FABM-PCLake – linking aquatic ecology with hydrodynamics. Geoscientific Model Development 9: 2271-2278.

SWAT2lake - An associated tool to QWET to tailor watershed delineations with SWAT to lake and reservoir waterbodies can be found here:

Molina-Navarro, E., Nielsen, A., Trolle, D. 2018. A QGIS plugin to tailor SWAT watershed delineations to lake and reservoir waterbodies. Environmental Modelling & Software 108: 87-71.

Video lecture on the concept of WET

This video lecture provide a brief background on the concept of WET, with focus on the individual model components, which comprise the core of WET.

User groups

The "Issues" board on the WET Gitlab page effectively comprises our User Group forum. Here, you may read through the posts and answers by other users, and post your own issues or ideas for new developments.