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Latest News from the Partnership

Cervical cancer cells. Photo: Sebastian Condrea

2021.03.19 | Research news

AI sup­por­ted diagnostics can fa­cil­it­ate screen­ing for cer­vical cancer in re­source-poor set­tings

A new study from FIMM group leader, Johan Lundin, at the University of Helsinki and Karolinska Institutet shows that artificial intelligence-supported digital microscopy at the point-of-care can be used to identify atypical Pap smears in a resource-limited setting.

Himanshu Sharma in the Umeå cryo-EM facility. Photo by Kai Ehrenbolger

2021.03.03 | People

Prestigious postdoctoral fellowship for structural biology and infection research in Umeå

Congratulations to Himanshu Sharma, a postdoctoral researcher in the Barandun Lab at MIMS & the Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University on receiving a prestigious Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) Individual Fellowship.

Photo: Colourbox

2021.03.02 | People

Norway's EMBL delegates, past and present

The EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Council helps to guide EMBL's operations, administratively and scientifically.

Image: Pixabay/Gerd Altmann

2021.03.01 | Research news

Children and brain tumours: In search of a cure

Blog by NCMM group leader, Dr Sebastian Waszak: Whilst there has been good progress in treating many types of childhood cancer, some remain incurable. New precision medicine approach offers hope for young patients diagnosed with a rare and incurable brain tumour.

AI. Image: pexels.com
Breast Cancer Cells: Dr. Cecil Fox, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

2021.02.19 | Research news

AI pre­dicts ef­fic­acy of breast cancer treat­ment dir­ec­tly from tu­mor ar­chi­tec­ture

Researchers from the University of Helsinki have demonstrated the possibilities of artificial intelligence-based algorithms in predicting the efficacy of a targeted cancer therapy based on the tumour tissue architecture only, without specific molecular tests.

Dr. Felipe Cava. Photo: MIMS

2021.02.16 | Research news

Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed

Research from the Cava Group at MIMS and collaborators at EMBL Heidelberg and Ohio State University has discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature. The study has been published in eLife.

Image: Colourbox.com

2021.02.11 | News from the management

DANDRITE receives 75 million DKK from the Lundbeck Foundation for the continuation of DANDRITE from 2023-2028

The grant extends the ambitious neuroscience research initiative in Denmark and provides DANDRITE with the opportunity to continue until 2028. The prolongation of DANDRITE plays a key role in the Lundbeck Foundation's strategy to fund talent development in the field of neuroscience.

2021.02.01 | People

DANDRITE opens call for two new group leaders

Our DANISH node has two group leader positions available in Molecular and Translational Neuroscience

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2021.01.19 | Research news

Major EU project will harness AI and genomics for disease prevention

An international collaboration project to develop and implement novel genome-based disease prediction tools has received over 10 million euros from the EU Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program. The project aims to demonstrate the potential and benefits of powerful artificial intelligence (AI) technologies on the generation of genetic…

2021.01.06 | People

Nordic EMBL Partnership: Annual call for PhD students

The Nordic EMBL Partnership has opened its annual call for outstanding students seeking PhDs in molecular medicine

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News on publications

Dr. Jonas Barandun
Light microscopy image of microsporidian spores of Vairimorpha necatrix. Picture by Charles Vossbrinck
a) The cryo-EM density of the microsporidia ribosome solved by Jonas Barandun and his colleagues. The large ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of blue and green while the small ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of yellow and orange. Novel identified factors MDF1 and MDF2 are labeled. b) The microsporidia ribosomal RNA compared with yeast rRNA. The bar to the right compares the stretched RNA in length. c) A comparison of ribosomal structures of the microsporidium V. necatrix (to the right) with selected structures from major branches of the tree of life. Organism names are indicated below (P. falciparum: Malaria parasite, H. sapiens: human, S. cerevisiae: yeast, fungi). Ribosomal RNAs are depicted in light-blue (LSU, large subunit) and yellow (SSU, small subunit). Elements that are not present in microsporidia are colored in orange and dark-blue. Illustration by Jonas Barandun

2019.07.28 | Publication

Miniaturized version of ribosome found in microsporidia

A research team lead by MIMS/SciLifeLab research group leader Jonas Barandun uses cryo-electron microscopy to provide near atomic details of the smallest known eukaryotic cytoplasmic protein synthesis machine, the microsporidian ribosome.

2019.06.13 | Publication

DrugComb, a one-stop solution to all your cancer drug combination data analysis needs

Assistant Professor Jing Tang, a principal investigator of the Network Pharmacology group at FIMM and at the UH Faculty of Medicine has led the development of DrugComb, an open resource for harmonizing cancer drug combination studies. Dr. Tang hopes that DrugComb would become a collaborative data analysis platform that would bring forth more…

2019.03.15 | Publication

Drug combination sensitivity scoring facilitates the discovery of synergistic and efficacious drug combinations in cancer.

The study was conducted by research groups lead by Jing Tang at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE) and the Faculty of Medicine and Caroline Heckman at FIMM. The results were recently published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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