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Latest News from the Partnership

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2020.05.07 | Research news

EMBL-EBI launches COVID-19 Data Platform

EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) at Hinxton, UK, has created the COVID-19 Data Portal to help coordinate viral genome sequence data across Europe

2020.04.21 | News from the management

Nordic EMBL Partnership awarded NordForsk funding

Grant awarded as part of Nordic Research Infrastructure Hubs call

LRRK2, DANi-011A, iPSC line generated by Sendai virus reprogramming. A) iPSCs stain positive for Alkaline phosphatase. B) Expression of pluripotent markers OCT4 and NANOG. C) DNA sequencing confirms the LRRK2 G2019S variant. D) Reprogrammed iPSCs no longer contain Sendai viruses. Credit: Denham group

2020.04.16 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

New pluripotent stem cell line generated from a Parkinson’s disease patient is aimed at studying PD mechanisms and as a drug-screening platform

Denham group at DANDRITE and colleague researchers have developed a new stem cell line (DANi-011A) from a Parkinson’s disease (PD) patient carrying a LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation that is identified in inherited and sporadic cases of PD. The established cell line enables in vitro modelling of PD and the development of potential treatment strategies for…

2020.04.07 | People

Coronavirus outbreak

The partnership nodes are committed to providing a safe work environment for their staff. New measures and activities are taken into action by the Nordic EMBL Partnership in relation to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Katherine Patrice Gill, External Communications Officer of DANWISE. Credit: Tibor Salzer
Katherine Gill gave a talk on “The science behind bias” at a pop-up event hosted by TEDx Aarhus, located at the Kvindemuseet in August 2019. Using her neuroscience background, Katherine spoke about how the brain innately makes associations for predicting future scenarios, and that this is the basic mechanism behind unconscious bias. Credit: Astrid Collin
Members of the DANWISE team during their first Annual General Meeting, held at Aarhus University, April 2019. Credit: Tibor Salzer

2020.03.30 | People , Knowledge exchange

DANWISE strives for gender equality, equal rights and opportunities in Denmark

The Danish Society for Women in Science (DANWISE) is a non-profit organization to address gender inequality in Denmark, representing women from academia and industry within the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) and Humanity fields. Katherine Gill, External Communications Officer of DANWISE and a postdoctoral…

Fly Copulation. Credit: Philipsborn Research group
Graphical abstract: During copulation, males transfer not only sperm, but also seminal fluid. The authors hypothesize: Specific components of the male accessory gland secondary cells - secondary cell products (SCPs) cause the female to start singing. Her singing in turn prompts the male to allocate his ejaculate differently, ultimately giving him a reproductive advantage over other males, by biasing the female to mate with the next male later. Credit: Peter Kerwin, PhD-student, Philipsborn group

2020.03.19 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Do your neighbours have a noisy love life? Consider yourself lucky that you are not a fruit fly! Anne von Philipsborn’s group has discovered that female fruit flies sing by pulsed wing vibrations while they are copulating.

The new study, published yesterday in Nature Communications, was led by experts in behavioural genetics and circuit neuroscience in Drosophila at DANDRITE. The researchers’ findings on Drosophila sexual behaviour are important for understanding the complexity of neurocircuitry and behavioural genetics. In this article, first author of the paper…

The graphical abstract shows the signalling pathways involved in cell death following treatment with the ER stressor thapsigargin. Credit: Lindner et al. 2020

2020.03.04 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

A recent publication by NCMM studied how the ER stressor drug thapsigargin and analogues for cancer-related therapies induce cell death in human cancer cells.

A recent publication by Lindner et al. entitled; “Cell death induced by the ER stressor thapsigargin involves death receptor 5, a non-autophagic function of MAP1LC3B, and distinct contributions from unfolded protein response components” studied how the ER stressor drug thapsigargin and analogues for cancer-related therapies induce cell death in…

Group leader Andrea Ganna. Credit: FIMM, University of Helsinki

2020.02.25 | People , Knowledge exchange

Introducing FIMM Group Leader Andrea Ganna

Andrea Ganna is a FIMM-EMBL Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in statistical genetics and epidemiology. In this article Andrea shares his research interests and explains how deep learning approaches and artificial intelligence can be used to leverage information from large…

The figure illustrates a proposed neural pathway that links the ON-OFF direction-selective (DS) cells in the retina (blue arrows) to the rostrolateral (RL) area. Credit: Rune N. Rasmussen

2020.02.13 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, Research news

Yonehara group discovers a new function of a specific type of retinal nerve cells and uncovers a nerve network that transmits visual information from retinal nerve cells into the cerebral cortex.

The new study, published this week in Nature Communications, was led by the neural circuitry team at DANDRITE. The researchers’ findings are important for understanding the mechanisms on how visual perceptions arise within the brain. In this article, first author of the paper, PhD-student at DANDRITE Rune Nguyen Rasmussen, sheds a light on their…

Dr Sandra Lopez-Aviles. Photo: Oda Hveem
The fission yeast S. pombe. Photo: J.Berger/M.Langegger/S.Hauf
Ruth Martin Martin, Researcher in the Lopez-Aviles Group. Photo: Oda Hveem
The Lopez-Aviles group at NCMM. Photo:UiO

2020.01.27 | People , Knowledge exchange

Meet Associate Professor Sandra Lopez-Aviles, NCMM, University of Oslo

Dr Sandra Lopez-Aviles joined NCMM in 2011. Her research focusses on understanding the mechanisms controlling cell cycle progression. In this profile article, Dr Lopez-Aviles discusses her group's current focus on the role of protein phosphatases in cell cycle regulation, as well as the potential translational impact of this work.

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