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Latest News from the Partnership

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2020.09.09 | Research news

The Nordic EMBL Partnership and COVID-19

Across the Nordic EMBL Partnership, a wide range of projects are underway to help tackle the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The Partnership is home to a high number of highly talented young group leaders, recruited according to the EMBL model, who are well equipped to help contribute towards research into diseases and societal emergencies like…

Dr. Andrea Ganna. Photo: FIMM
Dr Jonas Barandun. Photo: MIMS

2020.09.03 | Research news

ERC starting grants for two Nordic EMBL Partnership group leaders

The Nordic EMBL Partnership wishes to congratulate Dr. Andrea Ganna, group leader at FIMM, and Dr. Jonas Barandun, group leader at MIMS, on receiving an ERC Starting Grant.

An image of a mosquito thorax. Image from authors.

2020.08.28 | Research news

First mosquito cell atlas published in Science

Professor Oliver Billker, Director of MIMS, is a senior author on the paper, 'Mosquito cellular immunity at single-cell resolution'; findings that will help researchers to further understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections.

Dr. Dominik Fischer. Photo: MIMS

2020.08.24 | People

Welcome to: Dominik Fischer, Science Manager

Dr. Dominik Fischer joined MIMS in June 2020 as Science Manager. Here, he explains more about his role and what the Nordic EMBL Partnership annual meeting will look as it takes place online for the first time in September 2020.

Dr. Katja Kivinen. Photo: Jean-Luc Benazet

2020.08.05 | People

Meet Katja Kivinen, Research Director of the FIMM Technology Centre & HiLIFE Deputy Director for Research Infrastructures

Katja Kivinen leads the FIMM (Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland Technology Centre), which provides state-of-the-art biomedical research services to national and international research groups. Dr Kivinen is also HiLIFE Deputy Director for Research Infrastructures. In this interview, Dr. Kivinen speaks about her role as Research Director and…

Dr Sebastian Waszak. Photo EMBL

2020.07.11 | People

Welcome to: Dr. Sebastian Waszak

Dr. Waszak joined NCMM in March 2020 as head of the Computational Oncology group.Dr Waszak completed his postdoc at EMBL Heidelberg in the group of Jan Korbel. In this article, he describes his research into precision medicine for young people with cancer, the role that rare genetic disorders can play when it comes to cancer treatment, and what…

Dr Paula Lindner. Photo: UiO
Dr. Nikolai Engedal. Photo: UiO
Dr. Poul Nissen. Photo: AU photo

2020.07.02 | Research news

Paula Lindner: Joint PhD student, DANDRITE and NCMM

Paula Lindner defended her PhD on 9 June 2020. Her PhD was a joint project between NCMM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, and DANDRITE (the Danish Research Institute of Translational Neuroscience, Aarhus), Aarhus University.

Antibiotics bind to and corrupt the functioning of crucial elements of bacterial cells, such as the ribosome that synthesises proteins or RNA polymerase that reads genes to generate mRNA. To counter the action of antibiotics, bacteria have evolved numerous dedicated mechanisms of resistance. Commonly, these resistance mechanisms act by either destroying the antibiotic, pumping it out of the cell or permanently modifying the molecular target so it becomes immune to the antibiotic, e.g. by post-translational modification such as methylation.

2020.06.26 | Research news

High profile review publication on antibiotic resistance from the Hauryliuk and Atkinson labs, MIMS

In this review, published in the influential journal Nature Reviews Microbiology, Umeå researchers Vasili Hauryliuk (also affiliated with Tartu University, Estonia) and Gemma C. Atkinson, together with their collaborators Daniel N. Wilson (University of Hamburg, Germany) and Alex J. O’Neill (University of Leeds, UK) discuss an important and…

Dr Hanna M. Ollila. Photo: FIMM

2020.06.03 | People

Welcome to Hanna M. Ollila

Dr. Hanna M. Ollila is a FIMM-EMBL Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), based at the University of Helsinki. Hanna specializes in the genetics of sleep and brain autoimmunity. In this interview, Hanna sheds some light on her field of research and elaborates on future plans for her newly established research group.

2020.05.22 | Research news

Researcher profile: Camila Esguerra

Dr Camila Esguerra joined NCMM in 2014. Her research involves using zebrafish as a model to study brain function in health and disease. In this profile article, Camila discusses her research career so far, the benefits of using zebrafish in translational research, and her visions and plans for the future.

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Upcoming Partnership Events

News on publications

Guinea pig cell infected with Chlamydia caviae (white = host cell, yellow = nucleus of the host cell, green = bacteria; microscopic picture taken by Barbara Sixt).
Contributing researchers at Umeå University. From left to right: Johan Henriksson, Katarina Vielfort, Barbara Sixt, Samada Muraleedharan. Photo credit: Karsten Meier.

2019.11.08 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Targeted Gene Modification in Animal Pathogenic Chlamydia

Researchers at Umeå University (Sweden), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University (USA), now for the first time successfully performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia caviae.

Dr Irep Gozen. Photo: Oda Hveem
Simple protocell division in aqueous solution. Membranous vesicles (a) elongate and divide (b), resulting in two smaller vesicles (c). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Nanotube-based model for spontaneous division of protocells. Membrane-enclosed vesicles form on mineral surfaces (e.g. SiO2) and remain interconnected through nanotubes (upper image). Vesicles detach from nanotubes upon gentle hydrodynamic flow (lower image). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Surface-adhered, interconnected protocells. Microscope image: Elif Köksal, Gözen Lab. Scale bar: 10 µm.

2019.10.30 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New article from Irep Gözen: how did the first cell division event take place?

NCMM group leader Irep Gözen recently published a perspectives article in ACS Nano, where she presents a new hypothesis for how cells were first able to divide on the early earth.

(A) Schematic of the “space-time wiring” model. The input unit at the preferred side (Unit 1, blue) has slower kinetics than the unit at the null side (Unit2, magenta). (B) The offset of synaptic delay across input units in the preferred direction: the earlier but delayed input from Unit1 is integrated effectively with the later but fast input from Unit2. During null-direction motion, the offset mechanism does not work.  
The discovered 6 subgroups of glutamate inputs (G1-G6, coloured circles) to ON DS cells. The 6 groups have different temporal kinetics (fast/slow; transient/sustained) and spatially organized.

2019.10.14 | Publication, Research news, Knowledge exchange, People

Yonehara group at DANDRITE have identified a new circuit mechanism in mammalian retinal motion computation

Latest research from the group led by Keisuke Yonehara at DANDRITE has recently been published in peer-reviewed scientific journal “Current Biology”. The study is about the space-time wiring between a type of motion-sensitive cells that project to the brain for gaze stabilization and local excitatory cells in the mouse retina.

First author of the paper Ahmad Ali-Ahmad at work in the lab. Photo: Nadia Frantsen
Group leader Nikolina Sekulic. Photo: Oda Hveem
Illustration showing the effect of CENP-C binding to CENP-A nucleosomes. Further details can be found in the full article (link at the bottom of this page).

2019.09.11 | Publication, Research news

Research from the Sekulic Group provides new molecular insights into the structure and function of the centromer

New work from the group led by Nikolina Sekulic at NCMM has been published in EMBO Reports. The study sheds light on the structure of nucleosomes contained within the centromere; findings that will help to improve our understanding of the important molecular events that drive cell mitosis.

Dr. Jonas Barandun
Light microscopy image of microsporidian spores of Vairimorpha necatrix. Picture by Charles Vossbrinck
a) The cryo-EM density of the microsporidia ribosome solved by Jonas Barandun and his colleagues. The large ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of blue and green while the small ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of yellow and orange. Novel identified factors MDF1 and MDF2 are labeled. b) The microsporidia ribosomal RNA compared with yeast rRNA. The bar to the right compares the stretched RNA in length. c) A comparison of ribosomal structures of the microsporidium V. necatrix (to the right) with selected structures from major branches of the tree of life. Organism names are indicated below (P. falciparum: Malaria parasite, H. sapiens: human, S. cerevisiae: yeast, fungi). Ribosomal RNAs are depicted in light-blue (LSU, large subunit) and yellow (SSU, small subunit). Elements that are not present in microsporidia are colored in orange and dark-blue. Illustration by Jonas Barandun

2019.07.28 | Publication

Miniaturized version of ribosome found in microsporidia

A research team lead by MIMS/SciLifeLab research group leader Jonas Barandun uses cryo-electron microscopy to provide near atomic details of the smallest known eukaryotic cytoplasmic protein synthesis machine, the microsporidian ribosome.

2019.06.13 | Publication

DrugComb, a one-stop solution to all your cancer drug combination data analysis needs

Assistant Professor Jing Tang, a principal investigator of the Network Pharmacology group at FIMM and at the UH Faculty of Medicine has led the development of DrugComb, an open resource for harmonizing cancer drug combination studies. Dr. Tang hopes that DrugComb would become a collaborative data analysis platform that would bring forth more…

2019.03.15 | Publication

Drug combination sensitivity scoring facilitates the discovery of synergistic and efficacious drug combinations in cancer.

The study was conducted by research groups lead by Jing Tang at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE) and the Faculty of Medicine and Caroline Heckman at FIMM. The results were recently published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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