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Latest News from the Partnership

Picture: Maria Fällman and Kemal Avican at Umeå University campus. Credit: Gabrielle Beans Picón.

2021.06.08 | Research news

MIMS and FIMM collaboration: Stress responses in cross-microbial species are disclosed

The Fällman group has published a new article in Nature Communications with the title: “RNA atlas of human bacterial pathogens uncovers stress dynamics linked to infection”. The project involved collaboration with researchers at FIMM/University of Helsinki.

AI-detected suspicious regions in a PAP smear. Photo: Rahim Khan
Dr Johan Lundin. Photo: Ulf Sirborn

2021.05.12 | Research news

Johan Lundin: How AI can help in a healthcare setting

Professor Johan Lundin is a Research Director at FIMM (Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland), University of Helsinki. He is also a Professor of Medical Technology at the Karolinska Institutet. His research specializes in developing and studying technologies to aid diagnostics at the point of care, in particular in research-limited countries.…

2021.05.11 | Research news

Latest public release of FinnGen data

FinnGen, which is coordinated by researchers at Nordic EMBL node FIMM, is excited to announce that the FinnGen data freeze 5 results and summary statistics are now publicly available.

2021.05.04 | News from the management

Launch of Danemo: A new initiative to promote the opportunities at EMBL and EMBO

The establishment of DANEMO is designed to help strengthen the Danish life sciences and biophysics

Photo: Ellen Bushell and Oliver Billker, malaria researchers at MIMS, Umeå University. Credit: Mattias Petterson

2021.04.23 | Research news

Malaria researchers at MIMS, Ellen Bushell and Oliver Billker, reflect on World Malaria Day (25 April)

During the World Health Assembly in 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) Member States established 25th April as World Malaria Day. Fourteen years have passed, and malaria is still a global threat, claiming over 400, 000 lives every year, mostly killing children under 5 according to the WHO.

Photo: Joseph Chan/Unsplash

2021.04.20 | People

Three NCMM research groups extended for a further four years

Following a successful evaluation by NCMM’s Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), the NCMM Board has decided to extend the groups of Irep Gözen, Nikolina Sekulic, and Anthony Mathelier

Professor Janna Saarela in the Next Generation Sequencing Room at FIMM, University of Helsinki. Photographer: Kai Lindqvist

2021.04.19 | Research news

Immune cells out of control: how lethal hyperinflammation emerges from a novel gene defect

An international research team has discovered a novel subtype of a genetic immune deficiency disease. A genetically determined deficiency of the protein RhoG abrogates the normal killing function of specific immune cells, causing an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH).

GlyT1 (light blue) is a protein that transports glycine across the cell membrane (grey). To do this, it opens to the outside and inside of the cell alternately. In contrast to other neurotransmitter transporters, it is bound by its inhibitor (orange) from the intracellular side, rather than the extracellular one. The sybody, a synthetic mini-antibody (dark blue), also inhibits GlyT1 by binding to a novel extracellular site. Credit: Azadeh Shahsavar/DANDRITE

2021.04.08 | Research news

New perspectives for treating psychiatric disorders

Scientists at DANDRITE and EMBL Hamburg have determined the structure of Glycine Transporter 1. The finding could open new avenues for developing therapeutics for psychiatric disorders.

Plamena Markova. Photo: EMBL

2021.04.06 | People

International relations and their role in research at EMBL

Plamena Markova, Head of International Relations at EMBL, shares some insight into her role and how politics goes hand in hand with enabling scientific research.

The FIMM NGS Sequencing Laboratory. Photo: FIMM/University of Helsinki

2021.03.29 | Research news

Problems with cell’s skeleton and energy production: how a single gene defect can affect both neuronal development and immune system function

Researchers in Finland and Norway have discovered a gene defect that causes a novel inherited immune deficiency. The same gene, DIAPH1, has been previously shown to cause SCBMS syndrome, a rare genetic disease associated with severe brain development defects.

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Upcoming Partnership Events

News on publications

Protocells. Image: Advanced Science News

2020.09.02 | Publication

Rapid Growth and Fusion of Protocells in Surface‐Adhered Membrane Networks

Elevated temperatures might have promoted the nucleation, growth, and replication of protocells on the early Earth.

The scheme shows the TRACE method that labels active inputs to a specific brain area through a retrograde labelling activity depended viral approach. Credit: First author Nathalie Krauth

2020.05.14 | Knowledge exchange, Publication

Joint efforts between Nabavi and Capogna group have led to the development of a novel approach named TRACE ´Tracing Retrogradely the Activated Cell Ensemble’

The neural circuitry teams at DANDRITE and PROMEMO introduce a novel approach in their latest publication, which selectively labels sensory inputs that are activated by a defined stimulus and directed to a region of interest in the brain.

Photo: Manuel Rivas, Adapted from image by Lauren Solomon, Broad Communications

2020.05.06 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Gene vari­ants that pro­tect against glauc­oma iden­ti­fied, open­ing thera­peutic pos­sib­il­it­ies

An international research collaboration led by researchers from the University of Helsinki and Stanford University has identified rare changes in a gene called ANGPTL7 that lower intraocular pressure and significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma. The results open important new therapeutic possibilities.

The zebrafish facility, NCMM. Photo: Øyvind Eide.

2020.04.24 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

New work from the Esguerra group provides novel insight into disease mechanisms of Dravet syndrome

A new article from NCMM’s chemical neuroscience group published in Epilepsia sheds light on the early mechanisms underlying seizure onset in Dravet syndrome, a severe and devastating type of epilepsy that occurs in children and infants.

Schematic of polyamine export from lysosomes by ATP13A2. Wild type ATP13A2 modulates cellular polyamine (orange dots) content by exporting it from lysosomes (left). Impaired ATP13A2 function leads to the accumulation of polyamines in lysosomes (right), resulting in compromised lysosomes. In addition, the decrease in cytosolic polyamine content may also potential further disease phenotypes.

2020.02.03 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Assistant professor Joseph Lyons coauthors milestone paper in Nature on lysosome function.

New article published in Nature entitled “ATP13A2 deficiency disrupts lysosomal polyamine export” sheds light on a defective lysosomal polyamine exporter (ATP13A2) that represents a lysosome-dependent cell death pathway that may be implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Kufor-Rakeb syndrome – a rare form of inherited…

The publication's graphical abstract shows the signaling pathways involved in cell death following treatment with the ER stressor thapsigargin.
First author of the paper, Paula Lindner. Photo: Faculty of medicine, UiO
Corresponding author Dr Nikolai Engedal. Photo: Mechtild Hartlieb Engedal

2020.01.31 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New publication for NCMM researchers: novel insights into cell death-inducing signals activated by ER stress

The new study, published this week in the open access journal Cell Communication and Signaling, was led by the autophagy team at NCMM.

Guinea pig cell infected with Chlamydia caviae (white = host cell, yellow = nucleus of the host cell, green = bacteria; microscopic picture taken by Barbara Sixt).
Contributing researchers at Umeå University. From left to right: Johan Henriksson, Katarina Vielfort, Barbara Sixt, Samada Muraleedharan. Photo credit: Karsten Meier.

2019.11.08 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Targeted Gene Modification in Animal Pathogenic Chlamydia

Researchers at Umeå University (Sweden), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University (USA), now for the first time successfully performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia caviae.

Dr Irep Gozen. Photo: Oda Hveem
Simple protocell division in aqueous solution. Membranous vesicles (a) elongate and divide (b), resulting in two smaller vesicles (c). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Nanotube-based model for spontaneous division of protocells. Membrane-enclosed vesicles form on mineral surfaces (e.g. SiO2) and remain interconnected through nanotubes (upper image). Vesicles detach from nanotubes upon gentle hydrodynamic flow (lower image). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Surface-adhered, interconnected protocells. Microscope image: Elif Köksal, Gözen Lab. Scale bar: 10 µm.

2019.10.30 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New article from Irep Gözen: how did the first cell division event take place?

NCMM group leader Irep Gözen recently published a perspectives article in ACS Nano, where she presents a new hypothesis for how cells were first able to divide on the early earth.

(A) Schematic of the “space-time wiring” model. The input unit at the preferred side (Unit 1, blue) has slower kinetics than the unit at the null side (Unit2, magenta). (B) The offset of synaptic delay across input units in the preferred direction: the earlier but delayed input from Unit1 is integrated effectively with the later but fast input from Unit2. During null-direction motion, the offset mechanism does not work.  
The discovered 6 subgroups of glutamate inputs (G1-G6, coloured circles) to ON DS cells. The 6 groups have different temporal kinetics (fast/slow; transient/sustained) and spatially organized.

2019.10.14 | Publication, Research news, Knowledge exchange, People

Yonehara group at DANDRITE have identified a new circuit mechanism in mammalian retinal motion computation

Latest research from the group led by Keisuke Yonehara at DANDRITE has recently been published in peer-reviewed scientific journal “Current Biology”. The study is about the space-time wiring between a type of motion-sensitive cells that project to the brain for gaze stabilization and local excitatory cells in the mouse retina.

First author of the paper Ahmad Ali-Ahmad at work in the lab. Photo: Nadia Frantsen
Group leader Nikolina Sekulic. Photo: Oda Hveem
Illustration showing the effect of CENP-C binding to CENP-A nucleosomes. Further details can be found in the full article (link at the bottom of this page).

2019.09.11 | Publication, Research news

Research from the Sekulic Group provides new molecular insights into the structure and function of the centromer

New work from the group led by Nikolina Sekulic at NCMM has been published in EMBO Reports. The study sheds light on the structure of nucleosomes contained within the centromere; findings that will help to improve our understanding of the important molecular events that drive cell mitosis.

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