Latest news and events

Latest News from the Partnership

Dr Sebastian Waszak. Photo EMBL

2020.07.11 | People

Welcome to: Dr. Sebastian Waszak

Dr. Waszak joined NCMM in March 2020 as head of the Computational Oncology group.Dr Waszak completed his postdoc at EMBL Heidelberg in the group of Jan Korbel. In this article, he describes his research into precision medicine for young people with cancer, the role that rare genetic disorders can play when it comes to cancer treatment, and what…

Dr Paula Lindner. Photo: UiO
Dr. Nikolai Engedal. Photo: UiO
Dr. Poul Nissen. Photo: AU photo

2020.07.02 | Research news

Paula Lindner: Joint PhD student, DANDRITE and NCMM

Paula Lindner defended her PhD on 9 June 2020. Her PhD was a joint project between NCMM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, and DANDRITE (the Danish Research Institute of Translational Neuroscience, Aarhus), Aarhus University.

Antibiotics bind to and corrupt the functioning of crucial elements of bacterial cells, such as the ribosome that synthesises proteins or RNA polymerase that reads genes to generate mRNA. To counter the action of antibiotics, bacteria have evolved numerous dedicated mechanisms of resistance. Commonly, these resistance mechanisms act by either destroying the antibiotic, pumping it out of the cell or permanently modifying the molecular target so it becomes immune to the antibiotic, e.g. by post-translational modification such as methylation.

2020.06.26 | Research news

High profile review publication on antibiotic resistance from the Hauryliuk and Atkinson labs, MIMS

In this review, published in the influential journal Nature Reviews Microbiology, Umeå researchers Vasili Hauryliuk (also affiliated with Tartu University, Estonia) and Gemma C. Atkinson, together with their collaborators Daniel N. Wilson (University of Hamburg, Germany) and Alex J. O’Neill (University of Leeds, UK) discuss an important and…

Dr Hanna M. Ollila. Photo: FIMM

2020.06.03 | People

Welcome to Hanna M. Ollila

Dr. Hanna M. Ollila is a FIMM-EMBL Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), based at the University of Helsinki. Hanna specializes in the genetics of sleep and brain autoimmunity. In this interview, Hanna sheds some light on her field of research and elaborates on future plans for her newly established research group.

2020.05.22 | Research news

Researcher profile: Camila Esguerra

Dr Camila Esguerra joined NCMM in 2014. Her research involves using zebrafish as a model to study brain function in health and disease. In this profile article, Camila discusses her research career so far, the benefits of using zebrafish in translational research, and her visions and plans for the future.

Image: Shutterstock

2020.05.07 | Research news

EMBL-EBI launches COVID-19 Data Platform

EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) at Hinxton, UK, has created the COVID-19 Data Portal to help coordinate viral genome sequence data across Europe

2020.04.21 | News from the management

Nordic EMBL Partnership awarded NordForsk funding

Grant awarded as part of Nordic Research Infrastructure Hubs call

LRRK2, DANi-011A, iPSC line generated by Sendai virus reprogramming. A) iPSCs stain positive for Alkaline phosphatase. B) Expression of pluripotent markers OCT4 and NANOG. C) DNA sequencing confirms the LRRK2 G2019S variant. D) Reprogrammed iPSCs no longer contain Sendai viruses. Credit: Denham group

2020.04.16 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

New pluripotent stem cell line generated from a Parkinson’s disease patient is aimed at studying PD mechanisms and as a drug-screening platform

Denham group at DANDRITE and colleague researchers have developed a new stem cell line (DANi-011A) from a Parkinson’s disease (PD) patient carrying a LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation that is identified in inherited and sporadic cases of PD. The established cell line enables in vitro modelling of PD and the development of potential treatment strategies for…

2020.04.07 | People

Coronavirus outbreak

The partnership nodes are committed to providing a safe work environment for their staff. New measures and activities are taken into action by the Nordic EMBL Partnership in relation to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Katherine Patrice Gill, External Communications Officer of DANWISE. Credit: Tibor Salzer
Katherine Gill gave a talk on “The science behind bias” at a pop-up event hosted by TEDx Aarhus, located at the Kvindemuseet in August 2019. Using her neuroscience background, Katherine spoke about how the brain innately makes associations for predicting future scenarios, and that this is the basic mechanism behind unconscious bias. Credit: Astrid Collin
Members of the DANWISE team during their first Annual General Meeting, held at Aarhus University, April 2019. Credit: Tibor Salzer

2020.03.30 | People , Knowledge exchange

DANWISE strives for gender equality, equal rights and opportunities in Denmark

The Danish Society for Women in Science (DANWISE) is a non-profit organization to address gender inequality in Denmark, representing women from academia and industry within the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) and Humanity fields. Katherine Gill, External Communications Officer of DANWISE and a postdoctoral…

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Upcoming Partnership Events

Fri 02 Oct
13:00-14:00 | Aarhus, Denmark
Joint DANDRITE-Biomedicine/ Neuroscience Lecture
Joint DANDRITE-Biomedicine/Neuroscience Lecture with Nobel laureate in Psychology or medicine 2014 Dr Edvard Ingjald Moser. Dr Edvard Ingjald Moser will give a talk on "Space and time: Internal dynamics of the brain's entorhinal cortex"

News on publications

The scheme shows the TRACE method that labels active inputs to a specific brain area through a retrograde labelling activity depended viral approach. Credit: First author Nathalie Krauth

2020.05.14 | Knowledge exchange, Publication

Joint efforts between Nabavi and Capogna group have led to the development of a novel approach named TRACE ´Tracing Retrogradely the Activated Cell Ensemble’

The neural circuitry teams at DANDRITE and PROMEMO introduce a novel approach in their latest publication, which selectively labels sensory inputs that are activated by a defined stimulus and directed to a region of interest in the brain.

Photo: Manuel Rivas, Adapted from image by Lauren Solomon, Broad Communications

2020.05.06 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Gene vari­ants that pro­tect against glauc­oma iden­ti­fied, open­ing thera­peutic pos­sib­il­it­ies

An international research collaboration led by researchers from the University of Helsinki and Stanford University has identified rare changes in a gene called ANGPTL7 that lower intraocular pressure and significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma. The results open important new therapeutic possibilities.

The zebrafish facility, NCMM. Photo: Øyvind Eide.

2020.04.24 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

New work from the Esguerra group provides novel insight into disease mechanisms of Dravet syndrome

A new article from NCMM’s chemical neuroscience group published in Epilepsia sheds light on the early mechanisms underlying seizure onset in Dravet syndrome, a severe and devastating type of epilepsy that occurs in children and infants.

Schematic of polyamine export from lysosomes by ATP13A2. Wild type ATP13A2 modulates cellular polyamine (orange dots) content by exporting it from lysosomes (left). Impaired ATP13A2 function leads to the accumulation of polyamines in lysosomes (right), resulting in compromised lysosomes. In addition, the decrease in cytosolic polyamine content may also potential further disease phenotypes.

2020.02.03 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Assistant professor Joseph Lyons coauthors milestone paper in Nature on lysosome function.

New article published in Nature entitled “ATP13A2 deficiency disrupts lysosomal polyamine export” sheds light on a defective lysosomal polyamine exporter (ATP13A2) that represents a lysosome-dependent cell death pathway that may be implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Kufor-Rakeb syndrome – a rare form of inherited…

The publication's graphical abstract shows the signaling pathways involved in cell death following treatment with the ER stressor thapsigargin.
First author of the paper, Paula Lindner. Photo: Faculty of medicine, UiO
Corresponding author Dr Nikolai Engedal. Photo: Mechtild Hartlieb Engedal

2020.01.31 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New publication for NCMM researchers: novel insights into cell death-inducing signals activated by ER stress

The new study, published this week in the open access journal Cell Communication and Signaling, was led by the autophagy team at NCMM.

Guinea pig cell infected with Chlamydia caviae (white = host cell, yellow = nucleus of the host cell, green = bacteria; microscopic picture taken by Barbara Sixt).
Contributing researchers at Umeå University. From left to right: Johan Henriksson, Katarina Vielfort, Barbara Sixt, Samada Muraleedharan. Photo credit: Karsten Meier.

2019.11.08 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Targeted Gene Modification in Animal Pathogenic Chlamydia

Researchers at Umeå University (Sweden), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University (USA), now for the first time successfully performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia caviae.

Dr Irep Gozen. Photo: Oda Hveem
Simple protocell division in aqueous solution. Membranous vesicles (a) elongate and divide (b), resulting in two smaller vesicles (c). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Nanotube-based model for spontaneous division of protocells. Membrane-enclosed vesicles form on mineral surfaces (e.g. SiO2) and remain interconnected through nanotubes (upper image). Vesicles detach from nanotubes upon gentle hydrodynamic flow (lower image). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Surface-adhered, interconnected protocells. Microscope image: Elif Köksal, Gözen Lab. Scale bar: 10 µm.

2019.10.30 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New article from Irep Gözen: how did the first cell division event take place?

NCMM group leader Irep Gözen recently published a perspectives article in ACS Nano, where she presents a new hypothesis for how cells were first able to divide on the early earth.

(A) Schematic of the “space-time wiring” model. The input unit at the preferred side (Unit 1, blue) has slower kinetics than the unit at the null side (Unit2, magenta). (B) The offset of synaptic delay across input units in the preferred direction: the earlier but delayed input from Unit1 is integrated effectively with the later but fast input from Unit2. During null-direction motion, the offset mechanism does not work.  
The discovered 6 subgroups of glutamate inputs (G1-G6, coloured circles) to ON DS cells. The 6 groups have different temporal kinetics (fast/slow; transient/sustained) and spatially organized.

2019.10.14 | Publication, Research news, Knowledge exchange, People

Yonehara group at DANDRITE have identified a new circuit mechanism in mammalian retinal motion computation

Latest research from the group led by Keisuke Yonehara at DANDRITE has recently been published in peer-reviewed scientific journal “Current Biology”. The study is about the space-time wiring between a type of motion-sensitive cells that project to the brain for gaze stabilization and local excitatory cells in the mouse retina.

First author of the paper Ahmad Ali-Ahmad at work in the lab. Photo: Nadia Frantsen
Group leader Nikolina Sekulic. Photo: Oda Hveem
Illustration showing the effect of CENP-C binding to CENP-A nucleosomes. Further details can be found in the full article (link at the bottom of this page).

2019.09.11 | Publication, Research news

Research from the Sekulic Group provides new molecular insights into the structure and function of the centromer

New work from the group led by Nikolina Sekulic at NCMM has been published in EMBO Reports. The study sheds light on the structure of nucleosomes contained within the centromere; findings that will help to improve our understanding of the important molecular events that drive cell mitosis.

Dr. Jonas Barandun
Light microscopy image of microsporidian spores of Vairimorpha necatrix. Picture by Charles Vossbrinck
a) The cryo-EM density of the microsporidia ribosome solved by Jonas Barandun and his colleagues. The large ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of blue and green while the small ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of yellow and orange. Novel identified factors MDF1 and MDF2 are labeled. b) The microsporidia ribosomal RNA compared with yeast rRNA. The bar to the right compares the stretched RNA in length. c) A comparison of ribosomal structures of the microsporidium V. necatrix (to the right) with selected structures from major branches of the tree of life. Organism names are indicated below (P. falciparum: Malaria parasite, H. sapiens: human, S. cerevisiae: yeast, fungi). Ribosomal RNAs are depicted in light-blue (LSU, large subunit) and yellow (SSU, small subunit). Elements that are not present in microsporidia are colored in orange and dark-blue. Illustration by Jonas Barandun

2019.07.28 | Publication

Miniaturized version of ribosome found in microsporidia

A research team lead by MIMS/SciLifeLab research group leader Jonas Barandun uses cryo-electron microscopy to provide near atomic details of the smallest known eukaryotic cytoplasmic protein synthesis machine, the microsporidian ribosome.

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