Latest news and events

Latest News from the Partnership

Fly Copulation. Credit: Philipsborn Research group
Graphical abstract: During copulation, males transfer not only sperm, but also seminal fluid. The authors hypothesize: Specific components of the male accessory gland secondary cells - secondary cell products (SCPs) cause the female to start singing. Her singing in turn prompts the male to allocate his ejaculate differently, ultimately giving him a reproductive advantage over other males, by biasing the female to mate with the next male later. Credit: Peter Kerwin, PhD-student, Philipsborn group

2020.03.19 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Do your neighbours have a noisy love life? Consider yourself lucky that you are not a fruit fly! Anne von Philipsborn’s group has discovered that female fruit flies sing by pulsed wing vibrations while they are copulating.

The new study, published yesterday in Nature Communications, was led by experts in behavioural genetics and circuit neuroscience in Drosophila at DANDRITE. The researchers’ findings on Drosophila sexual behaviour are important for understanding the complexity of neurocircuitry and behavioural genetics. In this article, first author of the paper…

The graphical abstract shows the signalling pathways involved in cell death following treatment with the ER stressor thapsigargin. Credit: Lindner et al. 2020

2020.03.04 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

A recent publication by NCMM studied how the ER stressor drug thapsigargin and analogues for cancer-related therapies induce cell death in human cancer cells.

A recent publication by Lindner et al. entitled; “Cell death induced by the ER stressor thapsigargin involves death receptor 5, a non-autophagic function of MAP1LC3B, and distinct contributions from unfolded protein response components” studied how the ER stressor drug thapsigargin and analogues for cancer-related therapies induce cell death in…

Group leader Andrea Ganna. Credit: FIMM, University of Helsinki

2020.02.25 | People , Knowledge exchange

Introducing FIMM Group Leader Andrea Ganna

Andrea Ganna is a FIMM-EMBL Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in statistical genetics and epidemiology. In this article Andrea shares his research interests and explains how deep learning approaches and artificial intelligence can be used to leverage information from large…

The figure illustrates a proposed neural pathway that links the ON-OFF direction-selective (DS) cells in the retina (blue arrows) to the rostrolateral (RL) area. Credit: Rune N. Rasmussen

2020.02.13 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, Research news

Yonehara group discovers a new function of a specific type of retinal nerve cells and uncovers a nerve network that transmits visual information from retinal nerve cells into the cerebral cortex.

The new study, published this week in Nature Communications, was led by the neural circuitry team at DANDRITE. The researchers’ findings are important for understanding the mechanisms on how visual perceptions arise within the brain. In this article, first author of the paper, PhD-student at DANDRITE Rune Nguyen Rasmussen, sheds a light on their…

Dr Sandra Lopez-Aviles. Photo: Oda Hveem
The fission yeast S. pombe. Photo: J.Berger/M.Langegger/S.Hauf
Ruth Martin Martin, Researcher in the Lopez-Aviles Group. Photo: Oda Hveem
The Lopez-Aviles group at NCMM. Photo:UiO

2020.01.27 | People , Knowledge exchange

Meet Associate Professor Sandra Lopez-Aviles, NCMM, University of Oslo

Dr Sandra Lopez-Aviles joined NCMM in 2011. Her research focusses on understanding the mechanisms controlling cell cycle progression. In this profile article, Dr Lopez-Aviles discusses her group's current focus on the role of protein phosphatases in cell cycle regulation, as well as the potential translational impact of this work.

Photo: FIMM-Group Leader, Esa Pitkänen. Credit: FIMM/University of Helsinki

2020.01.09 | People , Knowledge exchange

Introducing Group Leader Esa Pitkänen

Esa Pitkänen is a FIMM-EMBL Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in computational cancer genetics, machine learning and bioinformatics. In this interview Esa shares his keen interests and sheds a light on how machine learning and computational analyses can be applied to…

2020.01.07 | News from the management, People

The Nordic EMBL Partnership is now seeking PHD students in Molecular Medicine

As part of the joint Nordic EMBL Partnership call for PhD students, we are seeking outstanding candidates for PhD positions at DANDRITE, FIMM, NCMM and MIMS.

2019.12.19 | News from the management, People

Scientific Manager for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS)

An exciting new position at MIMS

NCMM students at this year's symposium. Left to right: Ping-Han Hsieh, Rafael Puig, Flore Kersten, Aysu Kucukturhan, Karolina Spustová and Ganna Reint. Photo: Flore Kersten
Introduction talks in the main symposium lecture hall. Photo: Aysu Kucukturhan
The symposium was marked by the release of alpha helix balloons in the main hall of the EMBL headquarters. Photo: Flore Kersten
Group photo of all attendees at this year's symposium. Photo: EMBL PhD Symposium
NCMM's Karolina Spustová received one of two best poster prizes at the conclusion of the symposium. Photo: Aysu Kucukturhan

2019.12.12 | People , Conference

PhD students from the Nordic EMBL Partnership node NCMM, attend EMBL PhD symposium in Heidelberg

Nine PhD students from various NCMM groups attended this year's EMBL PhD Symposium in Heidelberg, Germany. Two students presented flash talks as part of the main program, and Karolina Spustová from the Gözen group was awarded a prize for the best poster.

Poul Nissen receives DKK 40 million (USD 6 million) from the Lundbeck Foundation's professor programme to conduct ground-breaking brain research. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2019.12.10 | Awards

Poul Nissen receives the Lundbeck Foundation's professor grant

The Lundbeck Foundation is awarding grants worth DKK 232 million (USD 34 million) to six leading neuroscientists. The LF Professorships programme is the Foundation’s largest grant allocation to date.

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Upcoming Partnership Events

Thu 16 Apr
18:00-18:00 | Oslo, Norway
4th Oslo Epigenetic Symposium. POSTPONED
The conference brings together leading scientists in the field of Epigenetics. Our goal is to highlight the latest advances in epigenetics, nuclear architecture and chromatin regulation.
Fri 24 Apr
14:15-15:15 | Aarhus, Denmark
Joint DANDRITE-Biomedicine/ Neuroscience Lecture
Joint DANDRITE-Biomedicine/Neuroscience Lecture with Nobel laureate in Psychology or medicine 2014 Dr Edvard Ingjald Moser. Dr Edvard Ingjald Moser will give a talk on "Space and time: Internal dynamics of the brain's entorhinal cortex"
Mon 04 May
08:00-17:00 | Lectures at KBC and laboratory demonstrations at UCEM, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
TEM sample preparation practical course part II (1.5 ECTS)
TEM sample preparation course part II – Chemical fixation, high pressure freezing, plastic embedding and staining methods including practice on ultra-microtome sectioning, TEM imaging and an introduction to (Focused Ion Beam) FIB-SEM and electron tomography.
Tue 05 May
09:00-18:00 | Aarhus, Denmark
Neuroscience Day 2020 - "Flowing Neuroscience" - CANCELLED
NeuroCampus Aarhus is hosting Neuroscience Day 2020. This year’s focus will be “Vascularization and flow in the CNS”. The talks will give perspectives on the crucial importance of adequate vascularization and flow in the CNS. Changes in perfusion – from molecular to macroscopic levels - results in a large number of diseases.
Tue 19 May
08:30-16:00 | Helsinki, Finland
NSHG-PM 2020. POSTPONED
2nd Biennial Conference of the Nordic Society of Human Genetics and Precision Medicine at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM in Helsinki, Finland.
Tue 02 Jun
08:00-17:00 | Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Cryo-EM sample preparation and data collection
The purpose of the course is to prepare and train our users in sample preparation methods, introduce users to the image data acquisition workflow, expand knowledge about cryo-EM methods and learn how to use cryo-EM.(Registration TBA)
Thu 18 Jun
09:00-13:15 | Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
EMDS 2020; Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Infection and Inflammation: Molecular Mechanisms and Roles in Pathology
The 34th Annual Conference is for scientists interested in basic and clinical aspects of monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and other myleoid cells in man and experimental animal models.

News on publications

Schematic of polyamine export from lysosomes by ATP13A2. Wild type ATP13A2 modulates cellular polyamine (orange dots) content by exporting it from lysosomes (left). Impaired ATP13A2 function leads to the accumulation of polyamines in lysosomes (right), resulting in compromised lysosomes. In addition, the decrease in cytosolic polyamine content may also potential further disease phenotypes.

2020.02.03 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Assistant professor Joseph Lyons coauthors milestone paper in Nature on lysosome function.

New article published in Nature entitled “ATP13A2 deficiency disrupts lysosomal polyamine export” sheds light on a defective lysosomal polyamine exporter (ATP13A2) that represents a lysosome-dependent cell death pathway that may be implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Kufor-Rakeb syndrome – a rare form of inherited…

The publication's graphical abstract shows the signaling pathways involved in cell death following treatment with the ER stressor thapsigargin.
First author of the paper, Paula Lindner. Photo: Faculty of medicine, UiO
Corresponding author Dr Nikolai Engedal. Photo: Mechtild Hartlieb Engedal

2020.01.31 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New publication for NCMM researchers: novel insights into cell death-inducing signals activated by ER stress

The new study, published this week in the open access journal Cell Communication and Signaling, was led by the autophagy team at NCMM.

Guinea pig cell infected with Chlamydia caviae (white = host cell, yellow = nucleus of the host cell, green = bacteria; microscopic picture taken by Barbara Sixt).
Contributing researchers at Umeå University. From left to right: Johan Henriksson, Katarina Vielfort, Barbara Sixt, Samada Muraleedharan. Photo credit: Karsten Meier.

2019.11.08 | Publication, Knowledge exchange

Targeted Gene Modification in Animal Pathogenic Chlamydia

Researchers at Umeå University (Sweden), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University (USA), now for the first time successfully performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia caviae.

Dr Irep Gozen. Photo: Oda Hveem
Simple protocell division in aqueous solution. Membranous vesicles (a) elongate and divide (b), resulting in two smaller vesicles (c). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Nanotube-based model for spontaneous division of protocells. Membrane-enclosed vesicles form on mineral surfaces (e.g. SiO2) and remain interconnected through nanotubes (upper image). Vesicles detach from nanotubes upon gentle hydrodynamic flow (lower image). Illustration used with permission from (1).
Surface-adhered, interconnected protocells. Microscope image: Elif Köksal, Gözen Lab. Scale bar: 10 µm.

2019.10.30 | Publication, Knowledge exchange, People

New article from Irep Gözen: how did the first cell division event take place?

NCMM group leader Irep Gözen recently published a perspectives article in ACS Nano, where she presents a new hypothesis for how cells were first able to divide on the early earth.

(A) Schematic of the “space-time wiring” model. The input unit at the preferred side (Unit 1, blue) has slower kinetics than the unit at the null side (Unit2, magenta). (B) The offset of synaptic delay across input units in the preferred direction: the earlier but delayed input from Unit1 is integrated effectively with the later but fast input from Unit2. During null-direction motion, the offset mechanism does not work.  
The discovered 6 subgroups of glutamate inputs (G1-G6, coloured circles) to ON DS cells. The 6 groups have different temporal kinetics (fast/slow; transient/sustained) and spatially organized.

2019.10.14 | Publication, Research news, Knowledge exchange, People

Yonehera group at DANDRITE have identified a new circuit mechanism in mammalian retinal motion computation

Latest research from the group led by Keisuke Yonehara at DANDRITE has recently been published in peer-reviewed scientific journal “Current Biology”. The study is about the space-time wiring between a type of motion-sensitive cells that project to the brain for gaze stabilization and local excitatory cells in the mouse retina.

First author of the paper Ahmad Ali-Ahmad at work in the lab. Photo: Nadia Frantsen
Group leader Nikolina Sekulic. Photo: Oda Hveem
Illustration showing the effect of CENP-C binding to CENP-A nucleosomes. Further details can be found in the full article (link at the bottom of this page).

2019.09.11 | Publication, Research news

Research from the Sekulic Group provides new molecular insights into the structure and function of the centromer

New work from the group led by Nikolina Sekulic at NCMM has been published in EMBO Reports. The study sheds light on the structure of nucleosomes contained within the centromere; findings that will help to improve our understanding of the important molecular events that drive cell mitosis.

Dr. Jonas Barandun
Light microscopy image of microsporidian spores of Vairimorpha necatrix. Picture by Charles Vossbrinck
a) The cryo-EM density of the microsporidia ribosome solved by Jonas Barandun and his colleagues. The large ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of blue and green while the small ribosomal subunit is colored in shades of yellow and orange. Novel identified factors MDF1 and MDF2 are labeled. b) The microsporidia ribosomal RNA compared with yeast rRNA. The bar to the right compares the stretched RNA in length. c) A comparison of ribosomal structures of the microsporidium V. necatrix (to the right) with selected structures from major branches of the tree of life. Organism names are indicated below (P. falciparum: Malaria parasite, H. sapiens: human, S. cerevisiae: yeast, fungi). Ribosomal RNAs are depicted in light-blue (LSU, large subunit) and yellow (SSU, small subunit). Elements that are not present in microsporidia are colored in orange and dark-blue. Illustration by Jonas Barandun

2019.07.28 | Publication

Miniaturized version of ribosome found in microsporidia

A research team lead by MIMS/SciLifeLab research group leader Jonas Barandun uses cryo-electron microscopy to provide near atomic details of the smallest known eukaryotic cytoplasmic protein synthesis machine, the microsporidian ribosome.

2019.06.13 | Publication

DrugComb, a one-stop solution to all your cancer drug combination data analysis needs

Assistant Professor Jing Tang, a principal investigator of the Network Pharmacology group at FIMM and at the UH Faculty of Medicine has led the development of DrugComb, an open resource for harmonizing cancer drug combination studies. Dr. Tang hopes that DrugComb would become a collaborative data analysis platform that would bring forth more…

2019.03.15 | Publication

Drug combination sensitivity scoring facilitates the discovery of synergistic and efficacious drug combinations in cancer.

The study was conducted by research groups lead by Jing Tang at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE) and the Faculty of Medicine and Caroline Heckman at FIMM. The results were recently published in PLOS Computational Biology.