Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Archive Archeology: Preserving And Sharing Palmyra’s Cultural Heritage through Harald Ingholt’s Digital Archives

News

Fig. 1. Funerary Relief, ca. 2nd-3rd century CE, limestone. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, purchase 1902, 02.29.1. (artwork in the public domain; photograph all rights reserved, The Metropolitan Museum of Art).
Fig 2. Archive sheet Palmyrene sculpture 67. (© Palmyra Portrait Project, Ingholt Archive at Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, PS67).

2020.11.18 | History and achaeology

Making Connections: The Work of Ingholt’s Archive in Rethinking Peripheries

The Archive Archaeology project finds connections across space and time. By drawing parallels between the eastern and western parts of the Roman Empire as well as the time of Harald Ingholt's scholarship with today’s, the archive suggests new potentials for Palmyrene funerary reliefs and Roman provincial sculpture more broadly.

2020.11.04 | History and achaeology

Archive Archaeology in Palmyra, Syria: A new 3D reconstruction of the Tomb of Ḥairan

New publication by Olympia Bobou, Nathalia B. Kristensen, Scott McAvoy and Rubina Raja.

2020.11.03 | History and achaeology

Research assistant (fixed-term contract)

Example of Ingholt’s archive sheets, depicting Palmyrene sculpture 687. An image of the sculpture is taped to the page and is surrounded by annotations made by Ingholt and the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. (© Palmyra Portrait Project, Ingholt Archive at Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, PS 687).

2020.10.08 | History and achaeology

Archive Archaeology Breaks Ground!

By Postdoc Amy C. Miranda.

2020.10.01 | History and achaeology, People

Introduction of Amy Miranda

New postdoctoral fellow in the project "Archive Archeology: Preserving And Sharing Palmyra’s Cultural Heritage through Harald Ingholt’s Digital Archives".

Events

No articles found in this list

Harald Ingholt & Palmyra

This book grew out of the exhibition Harald Ingholt and Palmyra, which was displayed in 2015 at the Museum of Ancient Art at Aarhus University, Denmark. The exhibition was based on research done within the framework of the Palmyra Portrait Project, which is funded by the Carlsberg Foundation.

English version

Danish version