Childhood, Intimacy and Surveillance Practices

Childhood, Intimacy and Surveillance Practices (CHiP) is a research project conducted by members of Surveillance Lab at Information Studies, Aarhus University. 

It investigates the use of surveillance and tracking technologies in intimate contexts of everyday life. It focuses on how children are engaged in self-monitoring, how they are surveyed, and how these practices are negotiated, resisted and subverted. The systematic scholarly inquiry into these issues has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the motives and consequences of the deep infiltration of technology into contemporary life in a networked world. The project emphasizes in-depth empirical analysis and theoretical discussion of surveillance and tracking as it is carried out and experienced by children and their significant social relations. As such, the project investigates two different surveillance practices which may overlap and intersect in various ways:

  1. Negotiating family tracking
  2. Schools as surveillance settings